Mona’s Morning Yoga Flow Routine - Eimele

Mona’s Morning Yoga Flow Routine

Celebrate International Day of Yoga with this morning flow created by eimele's in-house yoga expert, Mona.

“I practice Ashtanga yoga every morning, so I’d love to introduce you to my favourite routine, Sun Salutation A (Sūrya Namaskārә A). It can easily fit into your busy day, even if you’re travelling.” - Mona.

Your Morning Flow

Start with a short five-minute mediation to regulate the breath (Pranayama), standing or seated comfortably. If seated, move into standing (Samasthiti) when you’re ready.

Breathe in and bring your arms up, with your arms straight and your fingertips pointing upwards (Urdhva Hastasana). Take your gaze upwards, towards your fingers.

Breathe out and bring your hands down to standing forward fold (Uttanasana), relaxing your neck.

Breathe in and lift your chest up (Ardha-uttanasana). Look forward, leaving your fingers lightly touching the ground.

Breathe out and jump or step into plank with bent elbows (Chaturanga). Keep your fingers apart, arms strong, and elbows tucked close to your upper body.

Breathe in and move into upward-facing dog (Urdhva Mukha Svanasana). Your legs are lowered, your arms are straight, and your chest and eyes face upwards.

Breathe out and move into downward-facing dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana). Your sit bones (buttocks) are at the top of the posture. Keep your arms and upper body straight, but you can bend your knees a little. Stay for five smooth breaths in and out, with your eyes looking toward your navel.

Breathe in and jump or step into standing forward fold (Uttanasana), then take a breath out.

Breathe in and lift your chest up (Ardha-uttanasana). Look forward, leaving your fingers lightly touching the ground.

Breathe out, and return to standing forward fold (Uttanasana). Keep a soft feeling in your neck and shoulders.

Breathe in and bring your arms up, with your arms straight and your fingertips pointing towards the ceiling (Urdhva Hastasana). Take your gaze upwards, towards your fingers.

Breathe out and bring your arms down, back to standing (Samasthiti). Repeat five to ten times, depending on how long you wish to practise for.

 

You can close the practice with corpse pose (Savasana), lying down with limbs relaxed. Focus on keeping your breathing even and your mind calm. It can take some time to learn how to find a balance between focus and calmness during Savasana. 

 

The importance of yoga breaths

“Breathing is key to yoga and we should always breathe in and out for equally as long,” Mona explains. “Let the prana (air) go through your body thoroughly and smoothly through all postures. Try not to hold your breath.”

She adds that, “The way we breathe affects the entire health of our body, the state of our mind and our connection to Spirit. Yet throughout our daily lives, most people are unaware of this essential process. That’s why this Ashtanga flow sequence is great way to kick-start your day.”

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